What’s the Deal with Antioxidants?

What’s the Deal with Antioxidants?

            Lots of foods and products pride themselves on being rich in antioxidants, but what exactly do antioxidants do? According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), antioxidants “are man-made or natural substances that may prevent or delay some types of cell damage [and] diets high in vegetables and fruits, which are good sources of antioxidants, have been found to be healthy.”[1] Another thing antioxidants can help combat is something called “free radicals”, which can damage “cells and genetic material. The body generates free radicals as the inevitable byproducts of turning food into energy. Others are in the food you eat and the air you breathe. Some are generated by sunlight’s action on the skin and eyes. Free radicals come in many shapes, sizes, and chemical configurations. What they all share is a voracious appetite for electrons, stealing them from any nearby substances that will yield them. This electron theft can radically alter the “loser’s” structure or function. Free radical damage can change the instructions coded in a strand of DNA. It can make a circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL, sometimes called bad cholesterol) molecule more likely to get trapped in an artery wall. Or it can alter a cell’s membrane, changing the flow of what enters the cell and what leaves it.”[2]

To combat this issue, your body generates molecules to squelch free radicals in addition to pulling free radical-fighters from your food or supplements like Vemma, which is rich in mangosteen, a fruit with superior nutritional and antioxidant properties capable of producing a wide range of benefits; benefits that enhance many of the body's health-promoting capabilities.* Eating a balanced diet is a great way to ensure you are getting what you need, but there are certain foods with higher antioxidant contents than others. One study from 2010 compiled a database of more than 3,100 foods, beverages, spices, herbs, and supplements and analyzed the antioxidant levels of each. Their findings concluded that some of the foods highest in antioxidants include items you see everyday like “berries, fruits, nuts, [dark] chocolate, [and] vegetables.”[3] Below, check out some of the top antioxidant rich foods according to scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and enjoy these tasty treats while you help your body![4]

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*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

**Vemma Nutrition Company recommends following a healthy approach to weight loss by consulting with your physician or health care professional prior to starting any new exercise or diet plan.


[1] “Antioxidants: In Depth.” National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 4 May 2016, nccih.nih.gov/health/antioxidants/introduction.htm.

[2] “Antioxidants: Beyond the Hype.” The Nutrition Source: Harvard University School of Public Health, Harvard University, 26 Feb. 2018, www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/antioxidants/.

[3] Carlsen, Monica H et al. “The total antioxidant content of more than 3100 foods, beverages, spices, herbs and supplements used worldwide” Nutrition journal vol. 9 3. 22 Jan. 2010, doi:10.1186/1475-2891-9-3

[4] “20 Common Foods With the Most Antioxidants.” Edited by Charlotte E Grayson Mathis, WebMD, WebMD, 1 Apr. 2005, www.webmd.com/food-recipes/20-common-foods-most-antioxidants.

Mythbusting: Targeting Problem Areas in Your Workout

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